Tip Dresser According to the Present Invention

In general, a tip dresser of some type is configured to be extended in four directions from an axis of rotation, usually with the wooden rotary wheel acting as a hub. and, the tip dresser typically is configured with a folding cutting blade mounted on an end part of a sliding side’s end, preferably in each of the four directions. Obviously, this provides a convenient means to fold the dresser in a variety of directions, but it does complicate the design.

Tip Dresser

Additionally, there are two other types of dressers, one of which is known as the manual tip dresser. Typically, this type has a button in the lid that can be pushed to lock or unlock the dresser’s handle system. Furthermore, this style of dresser also often has a bench attachment that has a rectangular frame at its base. With this attachment, people can rest their feet on a bench while using the tip dresser.

The other type of dresser (known as the automatic or “electric” tip dresser) is different. The electric tip dresser, as the name suggests, uses a small electric current to cut an “unfolded” pattern into the sheetrock. It has an electrode in the center of the beveled pattern and a contact grid surrounding it. The user places his or her hand on the contact grid, pushes a button, and the beveled area of the sheetrock is “cleaned” using the electric current and the contact grid quickly and neatly grinds away the unwanted material.

A variation on this type of dresser has been produced by manufacturers that incorporate a cutting blade with a center “rotary” pole piece. This allows the user to move the cutting blade along the surface of the dresser in accordance with the changes in rotation center axis coordinates. The contact grid has a small “teeth” portion along its perimeter. When these teeth are pushed into the edges of the beveled area of the dresser, they are used to grind away the material rather than simply sweeping it across the cutting blade.

These dressers can also be manufactured with rotary nozzles instead of the center electrode tips. This allows users to move the bevel blade along the surface of the dresser according to the changes in rotation center axes. The user places his or her hand on the contact grid, pushes a button, and the beveled area of the dresser is cleaned using the electric current and the teeth of the beveling blade are grinded away. In this manner, users are able to operate the Tip Dresser according to the present invention.

Other exemplary devices include but are not limited to, vibrating cutter head units, which allow the user to operate the machine based on the frequency of vibration of the blade. In some instances, the cutting rate of the blade can be adjusted by turning a knob. Adjustable cutting speed and angle are important in controlling the operation of such machines. In this regard, it is to be noted that this invention includes various alternative means for operating the Tip Dresser according to the latest related art tip dresser specification and that the presently preferred embodiment is not only described herein but is exemplified by way of example in the following claims: